FIX THIS TOWN!

Last Friday, July 17th, we had our sixth Architectural Session at the Parrish Museum. In these sessions, modeled after jazz improvisations, I speak with architects (and sometimes artists whose work overlaps architecture) about their work.

But last Friday's sessions was about the future of the towns on the East End of Long Island. With my guests, Felipe Correa (Harvard GSD), and Jay Schneiderman (Suffolk County Legislator), and David Rattray (editor of East Hampton Start), we discussed the issues that face the towns on the East End of Long Island as they grow in population every year; and we talked about the urban future that we want to envision for ourselves and others.

The conversation was informative and animated and allowed the audience to raise their concerns, voice their wishes, and have a public conversation about an issue that so far has been kept out of the public realm.

The program was broadcast live. And an edited video of it will be available soon.

Thanks to the AIA Peconic and its membership for the support of the program.

from left: David Rattray (standing), Maziar Behrooz, Jay Schneiderman, Felipe Correa

from left: David Rattray (standing), Maziar Behrooz, Jay Schneiderman, Felipe Correa

PRO-BONO: Architects Who Serve Humanity

In the next installment of Architectural Sessions, Maziar Behrooz will interview architects who volunteer their time toward charitable causes, featuring special guests Sharon Davis, the New York-based architect who, in collaboration with Women for Women, created the Women's Opportunity Center for female survivors of war in Kayonza, Rwanda and artist/philanthropist Jane Walentas who founded the non-profit organization Jane's Carousel, overseeing the restoration of the Brooklyn landmark and creation of its Jean Nouvel-designed pavilion. 

Women's Opportunity Center, Rwanda, Sharon Davis Design

Women's Opportunity Center, Rwanda, Sharon Davis Design

A Note on My First House

The first house I built in East Hampton was long before the words 'sustainability' or 'green' were in our common vernacular. In fact with less than a handful of exceptions every house or building on the East End of Long Island was designed in a variation, often deformation, of the 'Shingle Style' [click this to read about the Shingle Style]. Modernism on the East End, while vibrant, experimental and profoundly captivating in the 60s and 70s, was hardly to be seen in the 90s. Developers, homeowners, realtors, with a unified front, wanted everything shingled. It was in this environment that I opened the office in East Hampton and began from the start to re-envision how a house could be designed or built.

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